Wednesday, May 11, 2016

How to age pots naturally


Summer is almost here (for me, that means the end of school and actually being able to get something done around the house, besides laundry and dishes!) so I am sprucing up the front stoop.



I found a vintage metal tea cart at an estate sale and decided it would be a good thing to use to add color to the stoop. I wire-brushed it down, wiped it off, and spray painted it peacock blue. It's fabulous!

The two shelves make it the perfect place for gardening supplies, like garden shears and a spade and some extra pots. But I wanted a little something extra on the top, and so I planted a container with some ornamental grass, yellow lantana and some petunias. But what really makes this container garden perfect is my weathered terracotta pot!


Years ago, I used to leave my pots out in the garden year-round to try and achieve this look, but it was a crapshoot. Sometimes I got the look I wanted, but more often than not, the pots broke or just ended up looking dirty. Then my mother, the master gardener, told me to use a garden lime paste to get the pot started. 

It's easy, and I have found a way I like to use to get the look I want:

*I mix equal parts garden lime and water to form a paste. 
*I use a clean, slightly damp terracotta pot.
*I smear a little of the paste onto the pot in random spots. (I use a small sponge brush for this.)
*I take the pot outside and put it in a shady spot.
*I wait a few days/weeks/months (it depends on how good my memory is).
*I (sometimes unexpectedly) find the pot again.
*I see if I like it. (Sometimes I don't and I sand it down or whatever to make it more interesting. Sometimes that means I paint it because it came out hideous.)
*I plant some stuff in it!

There are plenty of ways folks can get the aged look on a terracotta pot. You can find these ways on Pinterest or just google it. (I love how 'google' is a recognizable verb now.) The sky's the limit when it comes to garden accoutrements!! (Yes, I use the French spelling. It just sounds so much better!)

#decorenthusiaststyle
#containertips

10 comments:

Cassie @ Primitive & Proper said...

this is my favorite look for terra cotta pots. i have some that are aged naturally over time and are so pretty!

Dewena said...

I did not know about this treatment! I've always brushed them with buttermilk and covered them with a black plastic garbage bag to encourage a mossy look, but I love this.

andi filante said...

I have never heard of yellow mylanta, and I did't know you had to age pot!! What are the little wormy-looking things in that pot?

-andi

karen@somewhatquirky said...

So. Just in case I were to do this and I was going to try to not forget about it in a shady spot in my house . . . how long should I wait? Is it just for drying time?

karen@somewhatquirky said...

So. Just in case I were to do this and I was going to try to not forget about it in a shady spot in my house . . . how long should I wait? Is it just for drying time?

Heidi @ Decor & More said...

Love weathered pots... nice project! Now I want to see that tea cart!
xo Heidi

Tina@WhatWeKeep said...

I've never used garden lime. Interesting, I'll try it sometime. If I remember. ;)
Our Andi must be tipping the bottle again. LOL! Yellow Mylanta. hahahaha

AnnMarie aka Vintage Junkie aka NaNa said...

That pot looks really aged, naturally! Great thing to try. I want a closer look at your fabulous cart!!

Feral Turtle said...

What an excellent post Kirby. Thanks for this! Pinning.

Art and Sand said...

I just saw a cute table setting with terra cotta pots, but I thought they needed to be aged. Now I can use your instructions and get the look I want - hopefully.

Thanks

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